Pain in feet after jumping on trampoline

In response.

Pain in the feet after jumping on the trampoline may be caused by several situations. (1) An uneven landing of the feet on the canvas. (2) Twisting of the ankle or the muscles of the feet when landing on the canvas. (3) Uneven landing on the canvas with a lopsided or skewed body weight distribution and one foot bears more weight on impact on the canvas. (4) Landing on the ground instead of on the canvas, i.e., missing the entire trampoline at landing. (5) Twisting of the ankle and/or the muscles of the feet on impact on the ground after missing the trampoline entirely.

(1) By an uneven landing of the feet on the canvas I mean the soles of the feet come into contact with the canvas at a slightly different moment, and at that moment, the weight distribution bearing down on the muscles of the feet are uneven, and the muscles on the outward side of one foot will twist or tighten up slightly. Foot pain would then be noticed on the outer edge of the foot. This can happen both ways. At the moment of uneven impact, the muscles of one foot may twist or tighten up inwardly. Foot pain would then be noticed on the inside of the foot, and one may feel that the arch muscles of one foot being very tight and painful.

(2) Sometimes, a slight twist of the ankle at landing on the canvas can manifest as pain in the foot rather than pain in the ankles, especially when there is edema in the ankles. The swollen ankle will hurt only when pressed with the finger or thumb.

(3) When landing on the canvas with a skewed body weight distribution, and one foot bears more weight on impact, the different muscles in the feet may shift, slide over each other, stretch and pull at each other under the weight that is bearing down on the foot and the foot muscles would then try to accommodate the impact of the falling weight, thus freezing the now skewed and distorted muscles in place. That means a lot of pain afterwards.

(4) Landing on the ground instead of on the canvas is rather painful on impact, whichever part of the body hits the ground first. In a sense, when one misses the canvas, one is on a free fall even if one is attempting to make adjustments in mid air. This means that at the movement right before impact one’s fall and body position is out of control. In this moment right before impact, it would be very difficult to predict which part of the body will hit the ground first nor how that unpredictable part of the body will hit the ground. Twisted ankles, broken ankles, broken bones, are all possible.

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About masterchensays

Victor Chen, herbalist, alternative healthcare lecturer, Chinese affairs analyst, retired journalist
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