Chinese preference for male offspring has changed on Taiwan

Chinese preference for male offspring has changed on Taiwan

The National Health Administration of the Health and Welfare Ministry of Taiwan reported on October 11, 2016, that the traditional Chinese preference for male offspring has changed on Taiwan.

In 2011, 10.1% of adults over 20 years old said they preferred to have baby boys, but in 2015, 6.5% of them said they preferred baby boys.  In both 2011 and 2015, 18% of adults said they preferred baby girls.  In 2011, 14.7% of new mothers who had just given birth said they preferred baby boys, but in 2015, 8.4% of them said they preferred baby boys.

In 2011, 71.1% of adults said they had no preference as to the gender of their offspring, and that both a baby boy or a baby girl are equally welcomed.  In 2015, 74.9% of them said that a baby boy and a baby girl are equally welcomed.  Among new mothers in 2011, 64.6% said they equally welcomed either a baby boy or a baby girl, and in 2015, 73.6% said they equally welcomed either a baby boy or a baby girl.

From January to August, 2016, over 70,000 baby boys and over 64,000 baby girls were born on Taiwan.  The gender ratio of males to females in 2015 was 1.083 males to 100 females.

Taiwan banned gender screening and gender based artificially induced abortions in 2011.

In 2011, 91% of adults surveyed said they supported the ban on gender screening.  In 2015, 92% supported the ban on gender screening.  Among new mothers who had just given birth, 89% of them in 2011 supported the ban on gender screening.  In 2015, 91% of them supported the ban on gender screening.

In recent years, the male to female gender ratio of the first and second born has been between 1.06 males to 1.00 females and 1.09 males to 1.00 females, but among the third born babies, the male to female gender ratio has increased to 1.18 males to 1.00 females and higher.  In 2015, the gender ratio of males to females among all births was 1.083 males to 1.00 females, and the ratio among third births was 1.13 males to 1.00 females.  During the first 8 months of 2016, the male to female gender ratio was 1.081 males to 1.00 females while the ratio among third births was 1.11 males to 1.00 females.

Survey data on gender preference for the “next baby” among mothers who had just given birth, among their husbands and among their fathers-in-law and mothers-in-law is rather interesting.

In 2011, 38.8% of mothers who had just given birth had no gender preference for the “next baby”.  In 2015, 46.8% of mothers who had just given birth had no gender preference for the “next baby”.  Among their husbands, 49.0% of them in 2011 had no gender preference for the “next baby”.  In 2015, 56.1% of the husbands had no gender preference for the “next baby”.  Among the parents-in-law, i.e., specifically the parents of the husbands, in 2011, 53.2% had no gender preference for the “next baby”.  In 2015, 63.4% had no gender preference for the “next baby”.

In 2011, 22.4% of mothers who had just given birth preferred a “male” as the “next baby”.  In 2015, 16.3% of mothers who had just given birth preferred a “male” as the “next baby”.  In 2011, among the husbands, 19.1% preferred a “male” as the “next baby”.  In 2015, 12.8% preferred a “male” as the “next baby”.  In 2011, 27.8% of parents-in-law, i.e., specifically the parents of the husbands, preferred a “male” as the “next baby”.  In 2015, 13.7% of them preferred a “male” as the “next baby”.

In 2011, 37.7% of mothers who had just given birth preferred a “female” as the “next baby”.  In 2015, 27.6% preferred a “female” as the “next baby”.  Among the husbands, 28.6% in 2011 preferred a “female” as the “next baby”.  In 2015, 21.1% of them preferred a “female” as the “next baby”.   Among the parents-in-law, 9.5% of them in 2011 preferred a “female” as the “next baby”.  In 2015, 7.6% of them preferred a “female” as the “next baby”.

 

About masterchensays

Victor Chen, herbalist, alternative healthcare lecturer, Chinese affairs analyst, retired journalist
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