Taiwanese high school graduates’ English listening comprehension exams

Taiwanese high school graduates’ English listening comprehension exams

The results of the first 2017 academic school year’s high school graduates’ English comprehension exams was made public on October 28, 2916.  A total of 111,448 Taiwanese high school graduates registered for the exam, and 113,157 of them took the exam.  The exam is held twice each year, and English listening comprehension is graded for different levels of comprehension.  Of those who took the exam, 20,207 or 18.14% received a grade of A, 41,226 or 36.99% received a grade of B, 45,095 or 40.46% received a grade of C, and 4,920 or 4.41% received a grade of F.  The second English comprehension exam for high school graduates will be open to registration from November 4 to November 10, 2016.  Those who feel they did not do well in the first exam are also eligible to take the exam again.

The English comprehension exam for high school graduates begin in 2013.  In 2015, the score of the test became one of the items of evaluation for qualification of students applying for university admissions, but for the 2017 academic year, only 5% of university departments have included it as such.  Some 65% of Taiwanese universities will take it into consideration for students who apply for admission based on merit and recommendation rather than through general assignment by national college entrance exam score.  Some colleges and universities will take it into consideration as a basis for advance placement or waiving freshman English class requirements.  Many high school graduates are therefore willing to take the exam for the freshman English class waiver or for advanced placement.

Since Taiwan’s high schools emphasize only reading and writing, high school students say that taking the exam enhances their competitiveness while not studying and taking the exam decreases their competitiveness.

 

About masterchensays

Victor Chen, herbalist, alternative healthcare lecturer, Chinese affairs analyst, retired journalist
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