Monthly Archives: March 2018

Child abuse in Taiwan

Child abuse in Taiwan Between January and September 2017, there were 3,067 cases of domestic child abuse on Taiwan. Child abuse resulting from improper discipline numbered 1,259 cases, negligence 606 cases, physical abuse 444 cases, sexual abuse 393 cases, psychological … Continue reading

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Taiwan’s internet crime

Taiwan’s internet crime In 2017, there were 14,853 internet crimes committed, an increase of 11.2% from the number recorded in 2016. They include 4,223 cases of internet fraud or 28.4% of the total, 2,323 cases of slander or 15.6% of … Continue reading

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Dementia in Taiwan

Dementia in Taiwan Based on an average of 8.04% of Taiwanese seniors over 65 years old who suffer from some sort of dementia in a 2011-2013 survey by the Taiwan Dementia Association, an estimate of the number of seniors with … Continue reading

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Humanitarianism and community spirit

Humanitarianism and community spirit A humanitarianism and social science study camp was held for Taiwanese high school students.  It was sponsored by Taiwan’s Ministry of Science and Technology as an educational program.  It is held each year with the participation … Continue reading

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Taiwan’s salary and life’s pressures

Taiwan’s salary and life’s pressures Taiwan’s 1111 Manpower Bank surveyed 1,145 responses of employed Taiwanese 35 years old and younger on March 12-27, 2018.  The survey found that 72% earn an average monthly salary of less than NT$40,000, 22% engage … Continue reading

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Taiwan’s onion pickers

Taiwan’s onion pickers From March 20 to the end of April, 2018, 200 Taiwanese Naval Marines work along side 150 students from Mingdao University and the National Pingtung University of Science and Technology in the onion fields on Pingtung’s Heng … Continue reading

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“One high, two lows, three no’s”

“One high, two lows, three no’s” This is a description of the situation young Taiwanese workers are now in. They are “highly educated”, their “wages are low” and they have “a low sense of achievement”, and they “don’t want to … Continue reading

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