Taiwan’s long term care law goes into effect

Taiwan’s long term care law goes into effect

Taiwan’s long term care law, promulgated on June 3, 2015, set to be implemented in two years, goes into effect today, June 3, 2017.  It defines long term care personnel as legally recognized professionals serving home care, community care, institutional residential care and combined services for senior care.

The law stipulates that foreigners initially hired abroad as senior home care workers in Taiwan and who have come to Taiwan for the first time are eligible to receive supplementary training in addition to the 90 hours of preliminary training they receive in their home country before coming to Taiwan specifically as home care workers.  Upon completing supplementary training in Taiwan, they will be certified, and every six years, they will have to complete 120 credits of continuing education to maintain their professional status.

On May 17, 2017, Changhua county held a training session for foreign home care workers to train them in emergency care procedures including CPR and the Heimlich maneuver and other emergency care techniques and skills.  Changhua county has 50,105 foreign workers, and 10,117 of them are home care workers taking care of infirm seniors.

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In Taiwan, 22% of female desk job workers do not want children

In Taiwan, 22% of female desk job workers do not want children

According to a 1111 Manpower Bank survey of 874 responses conducted on April 20 to May 4, 2017, 22% of Taiwan’s female desk job workers do not want children, 78% do, and 61% among them hope to have two children and 29% hope to have one child.

The main worries about not wanting to have children are not being able to afford to raise a child (28.8%), impact on the quality of life without children (20.8%), and future environment that may be harmful to the next generation offspring (16.2%).

Of those who do want children, 57.5% want financial stability first before having children, 55.7% want to have children before they are physically unable to take care of children, and 34.5% want a stable spousal relationship to have children.  Of working mothers who have had children, 31% leave their jobs after giving birth, 37% take advantage of childcare leave, and 32% return to work immediately after giving birth.

The yes123 online job search site survey of 1,158 individual responses and 936 company responses conducted from April 20 to May 2, 2017, showed that 92.2% of working mothers feel under pressure and 21.8% feel the pressure of working and taking care of their children is nearly unbearable.  There are 75.1% of working mothers who feel guilty for not taking care of their children themselves.  On average, a working mother spends 111 minutes with her children a day.

There are 77.4% of Taiwanese companies that are willing to give priority in hiring a job seeking mother, 38.1% are willing to pay a higher salary to working mothers, 23% of businesses say if the working mother takes a childcare leave for half a year and returns to work, she will not be assigned to her original job.

 

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Climate change survey

Climate change survey

A Taiwan Institute for Sustainable Energy (TAISE) survey of 1,108 adults over 18 years old conducted on March 12-15, 2017, about the Taiwanese people’s attitude towards climate change showed that 93.1% believe that climate change is occurring, 73.1% are concerned about climate change, 48.9% say they understand climate change, 57.7% say they do discuss it among friends and colleagues, 64.2% believe Taiwan’s energy conservation and carbon reduction efforts are not effective, and 92.1% support developing reusable energy sources in a big way.

 

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In Taiwan, 57.24% of women work

In Taiwan, 57.24% of women work

Of all women between 15 and 64 years old in Taiwan based on the government’s 2016 data, there are 2,961,000 working women, constituting 57.24%.

There are 1,572,000 women who have not left their jobs after marriage, constituting 53.09%.

There were 520,000 women who left their jobs due to marriage, 384,000 women who left their jobs due to giving birth.  There are 2,212,000 married women who do not work, there are 644,000 of them who have left their jobs due to marriage and have not returned to work up to now (May, 2017), and 404,000 of them who have left their jobs due to giving birth and have not returned to work up to now (May, 2017).

There were 673,000 women who had left their jobs due to marriage but have returned to work.  The return rate is 51.1%, and on average, time between jobs is 6 years and one month.  There were 794,000 women who had left their jobs due to giving birth to their first child.  There are 505,000 women who have returned to work after giving birth.  The percentage of women returning to work after given birth is 55.57%.  Time between jobs averages 5 years and 5 months.

 

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Taiwan’s older mothers

Taiwan’s older mothers

In 2016, 67.1% of mothers giving birth were over 30 years old, averaging 30.7 years old who gave birth to their first born.  In 2006, the average age of mothers giving birth that year to their first born was 28.1 years old.  In 2016, 40% of all mothers giving birth that year were between 30 and 34 years old and 27.1% were over 35 years old.  In 2005, 43% of mothers giving birth that year were over 30 years old.

In 2016, 100,000 baby girls were born and 108,000 baby boys were born.  Female newborns constituted 48.2% of all births.  The male to female ratio was 107.6 males to 100 females.

In 2016, 13,000 foreign mothers gave birth in Taiwan, constituting 6.1% of all mothers giving birth that year.  This is a drop in the number of foreign mothers giving birth in 2006 of 5.5%.

In 2016, 50% of mothers gave birth to their first born, 37.8% gave birth to their second child, and 10% gave birth to their third child.  The ratio of males to females among the first born in 2016 was 106.5 males to 100 females, 107.8 males to 100 females among the second newborn babies, and 113.0 males to 100 females among the third newborn babies.  In 2007, the male to female ratio among the third newborn babies was 126.4 males to 100 females.

 

 

 

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Newborns of foreign workers in Taiwan will get immediate universal health coverage

Newborns of foreign workers in Taiwan will get immediate universal health coverage.  Previously, the newborn had to wait six months before coverage is granted.  The current law is being revised.  When the revised law is passed, newborns of foreign white and blue collar workers in Taiwan will all be eligible for immediate universal health coverage at moment of birth.

 

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Taiwanese Hakka

Taiwanese Hakka

At the end of 2016, Taiwan has a Hakka population of 4,530,000, an increase of 330,000 from 2011.

The Taiwanese Hakka population constitutes 19.3% of the total population of 23,540,000 people.

However, only 46.8% of the Taiwanese Hakka, or 2,120,040 of them can speak Hakka.

Over the past five years from 2011 to 2016, the Taiwanese Hakka population increased by 330,000.  This means that the number of births of the Taiwanese Hakka population over the past five years was 66,000 babies a year.

 

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